Sunday, June 5, 2011

Welsh onion



Last year when I was surfing through seed catalogues making picks for the 2010 growing season, my eye fell on Welsh onions, described as a perennial onion. Well, anything edible that's also a perennial sounds good to me, so I bought a packet and grew six clumps that I transplanted into the herb bed. They grew happily, looking very much like scallions, and overwintered just as happily, staying green through all the snow. And now, this spring, they're flowering - gorgeously.

Here's my problem: what exactly is a perennial onion? I know I can cut the green part off and it will regrow, like chives. Is that all it is - a beefier version of a chive? Because for sure, if I dig up the bulb, the life of that particular perennial comes to a close. Somehow I expected more than just big chives. Did my imagination simply run away with me?

And while I'm asking what are probably really stupid questions, why don't seed packets give harvesting tips as well as planting information? Just wondering. . .

7 comments:

Toni aka irishlas said...

I've never heard of a perinnial onion, so, I'm no help what so ever!

They're great to look at - a very attractive plant!

Let us know once you figure it out. You've got my curiousity going.

Natalie said...

Hear! Hear! I am all for more information. Those seed packets are too vague, too stingy with their information. I hope someone can enlighten us all... I'll be checking in!

Lisa said...

What I have always thought would be good information to add to the seed packet is a photo and/or description of what a plant looks like when it first comes up!
If one has never planted that particular plant before, how is one to know if it is the plant or a weed when it first makes an appearance??!
Lisa

Anonymous said...

Try looking at this, maybe it'll help: http://www.patnsteph.net/weblog/2008/05/perennial-onion-harvest/

Paula said...

And while we're on the subject of seed packets, don't lump cultivation of different varieties of the same thing all together. Growing celeriac is not like growing celery.

It is a pretty flower, though. It would probably be stunning in a bouquet, although it probably wouldn't smell very good (at least, not in a floral way- it would probably smell like dinner!).

~Kim at Golden Pines~ said...

Hi Miriam, I'm clueless about them, and only know that they do make for interesting pictures! :-)

mead said...

The forest garden Man, Martin Crawford of Agroforestry Research Trust, sells perrenial onions and as far as i can make out they clump, like apparently shallots do, produce other bulbs from their roots like my amarylis do, so after two years i can divide the clump up and get masses of bulbles from the three i planted a bit jammed up in the pot copying a dutch friend i had, to plant in groups of threes in new pots, so they in their turn can make more bulbs. I dont force the mararylis and they flower in spring, I dont lift the bulbs but leave themin th epots and water them all year round just not giving them as much as i giv esome other plants but then on a madrid balcony it doe snot freeze very often.
In the case of onions clumping growing bulbs froom the base of the main bulb must mean you can pick one that has got big and leave the other little bulbs the big one has produced round it in the ground to harvest some other time.
Looking for perrenial onions on google,so as to understand more about them I found an American site that is called, heritage onions, if I remember right, that like Crawford, talks of perenial varieties of leeks and garlic and onion and that was the first site mentioned on google talking of perrenial onions so i suppose i can find lots more information on them by searching further. agri rose macaskie.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...